2014 Autumn - Farmers fare well with better animal welfare

Please note single Journal articles are not available in hard copy.

To download the free editorial articles click here

This catalog has no sub-catalogs.

Farm Policy Journal: Vol 11 No 1 2014 Autumn - Full Journal - Farmers fare well with better animal welfare

Australian Farm Institute (2014), Farmers fare well with better animal welfare, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1 - Autumn 2014, Surry Hills, Australia 
ISSN 1449–2210 (Print)
ISSN 1449–8812 (Web)

$60.50


FPJ1101C - Hemsworth, P et al. (2014) - Do Natural Settings Safeguard the Welfare of Domesticated Animals?

FPJ1101C - Hemsworth, P et al. (2014) - Do Natural Settings Safeguard the Welfare of Domesticated Animals?, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 1-7, Autumn, Surry Hills, Australia.

The use of animals in farming, as with any other animal use, necessitates the responsibility of safeguarding the welfare of these animals. The widely-held view in the Australian community is that the use of animals by humans is acceptable provided that such use is humane. A common belief in the community is that farm animals should be allowed to lead natural lives displaying their normal behaviour and consequently from an animal welfare perspective, some consider modern indoor production systems for livestock as inherently ‘bad’. High animal welfare standards require care and maintenance of animals to meet their nutritional, climatic, social and health requirements and this level of animal management should be provided in any livestock production system, whether indoors or outdoors.
The animal welfare movement is increasingly questioning and influencing views on animal use and the acceptability of various animal management options. While public attitudes to animal welfare are influential, science has an important role in underpinning governments’ decisions, on behalf of the community, on animal use and the attendant conditions and compromises. Science provides the means to understand the impact of a production system on the animal and thus underpins the evidence-based development of animal welfare standards. The exclusion of science in this process of establishing animal welfare standards will result in emotive or ideological arguments from sectional interests dominating community debate.

 

$12.10


FPJ1101D - Grandin, T (2014) - Making Slaughterhouses, More Humane for Cattle, Pigs, and Sheep

FPJ1101D - Grandin, T (2014) - Making Slaughterhouses, More Humane for Cattle, Pigs, and Sheep, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 9-31, Autumn, Surry Hills, Australia.

When a stunning method is being evaluated, it is essential that the animal-handling and restraint methods that are used with it are also examined. This makes it possible to determine the effect of the entire system on animal welfare. Cattle, pigs, and sheep will move easily through the races at a slaughter plant if visual distractions such as reflections on shiny metal, dangling chains, moving equipment, or people up ahead are removed. The most important scientific research on captive bolt, CO2, and electrical stunning methods is reviewed. A common mistake made by people evaluating insensibility is to misinterpret reflexive leg kicks as a sign of return to sensibility. When religious slaughter is being evaluated, the variable of how the animal is restrained must be separated from the variable of slaughter without stunning. Slaughter can be done with a high level of animal welfare.

 

$12.10


FPJ1101E - Sloyan, M (2014) - The Costs and Benefits of Animal Welfare: How the United Kingdom Pork Industry Adapted to Changes in Animal Welfare

FPJ1101E - Sloyan, M (2014) - The Costs and Benefits of Animal Welfare: How the United Kingdom Pork Industry Adapted to Changes in Animal Welfare, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 33-7, Autumn, Surry Hills, Australia.

The United Kingdom was one of the world’s early movers regarding bans on the use of sow stalls in the pig farming industry. The Welfare of Pigs Regulations banning the use of sow stalls were passed in 1991, and came into effect in 1999. This transition proved disruptive for individual pig farmers and equated to an extra cost of £2.70 per pig and a 15% to 50% profit loss. Unluckily for the sector, this change occurred at a very tough time for the European pork market. From 1997 to 2008 the British pig herd decreased by 48% while British self-sufficiency in pork decreased from 82% to 48%. This article offers the farm sector’s perspective on this historical change and draws interesting lessons for the future of effective animal welfare in the European Union, calling for policies focusing on welfare outcomes rather than changes in production systems.

 

$12.10


FPJ1101F - Goodfellow, J et al.(2014) - The Future of Animal Welfare Policy and its Implications for Australian Livestock Industries

FPJ1101F - Goodfellow, J et al.(2014) - The Future of Animal Welfare Policy and its Implications for Australian Livestock Industries, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 39-49, Autumn, Surry Hills, Australia.

As economic prosperity rises, public concern for the welfare of animals increases. Such trends are occurring throughout the developed world and are likely to occur within the growing middle classes of the BRIC economies (Brazil, Russia, India and China). Animals, including livestock, are increasingly being viewed less in instrumental terms for their material value to human beings and more as sentient beings with intrinsic value. The recognition of sentience and intrinsic value is likely to result in increased demands for animals to be treated with greater consistency regardless of the purpose for which the animal is used. Significant implications for the way livestock industries deal with animals are expected. Changing consumer expectations will impact market structures increasing market share for food products with higher welfare attributes. Public scrutiny of controversial production practices will increase from a wider range of institutional sources including the legal profession and consumer protection bodies. The approach industry takes to responding to public concerns can limit the extent of societal conflict and the level of impact upon business, and can create new market opportunities by fostering consumer willingness to pay for higher welfare attributes.
This paper first explores the social and economic drivers behind increasing concern for animal welfare before considering the implications such concerns pose for livestock industries and the development of animal welfare policy in Australia. The paper will conclude with recommending a number of key strategies for livestock industries moving forward including taking a more proactive and engaging approach to public concerns about animal welfare largely through efforts to increase the openness and transparency of production practices.

 




 

$12.10


FPJ1101G - Murray, G (2014) - Interview with Gardner Murray

FPJ1101G - Murray, G (2014) - Interview with Gardner Murray, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 51-7, Autumn, Surry Hills, Australia.

 




 

$12.10


FPJ1101H - Gordon, D (2014) - Interview with Dougal Gordon

FPJ1101H - Gordon, D (2014) - Interview with Dougal Gordon, Farm Policy Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 57-9, Autumn, Surry Hills, Australia.

 




 

$12.10


Purchase a
membership and gain
unlimited access to
our journal and
research library

LEARN MORE BECOME A MEMBER

Purchase our
latest report

READ MORE