2011 Winter - Foreign investment in Australian agriculture, myths and realities

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FPJ0802 Burdon J Jeremy, Lee Bruce, Higgins TJV, The national and international dynamics of public-private partnerships in biotechnology R and D

Burdon Jeremy J, Lee Bruce, Higgins TJV, The national and international dynamics of public-private partnerships in biotechnology R&D, Farm Policy Journal, Vol 8, Number 2, Winter 2011, Foreign investment in Australian agriculture: myths and realities, Australian Farm Institute, p 21-29
ISSN 1449-8812

Agricultural research and development (R&D) is a critical element in the world’s response to the need for sustainable global food security. While transnational efforts in agriculture are not new, the current complexity and rapidity of change in modern biological and related sciences is transforming the practice of plant and animal R&D and in the process inevitably leading to a major globalisation of science and knowledge generation. There has been an inevitable move towards increasing private sector involvement in agricultural R&D as governments have tended to focus funding on areas other than agriculture, as the private sector has increasingly found ways of obtaining a return on investment, and as the costs of research has grown. Indeed, there is a synergy of need and benefit for both public and privately funded research efforts to engage. The question is not whether or not to engage with private sector research companies but how this can be done while simultaneously protecting a country’s public interests. Establishment of long-term, successful public-private partnerships is achieved through early alignment of vision and articulation of a common purpose. In a broad sense, such partnerships are based on the same criteria as any successful relationship – clear understanding of needs and expectations, a general commonality of views and aims, clear understanding of relationship boundaries, and the development of trust and respect. As in any relationship, difficulties arise when aims shift from their original thrust and this is not effectively communicated.FDI, Foreign Investment, Agriculture, agribusiness, R&D, biotechnology

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Farm Policy Journal - Vol 8 No 2 2011 Winter - Full Journal

Farm Policy Journal, Vol 8, Number 2, Winter 2011, Foreign investment in Australian agriculture: myths and realities, Australian Farm Institute, p 1-50
ISSN 1449-8812

FDI, Foreign Investment, Agriculture, agribusiness, R&D, land grab, biotechnology

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FPJ0802 Broadbent Jennifer, Pritchard Bill, Is farmland up for grabs, patterns of land ownership in rural NSW

Broadbent Jennifer, Pritchard Bill, Is farmland up for grabs? Patterns of land ownership in rural NSW, Farm Policy Journal, Vol 8, Number 2, Winter 2011, Foreign investment in Australian agriculture: myths and realities, Australian Farm Institute, pp 11-19
ISSN 1449-8812

Prompted by long-range forecasts of higher prices for agricultural commodities, the direct ownership of productive agricultural lands have come under the watchful eye of international investors and sovereign wealth funds as a strategically important, long-term asset class. Although this newfound interest in agricultural land acquisitions has been played out mainly in the developing world, its reverberations have been felt in Australia. This has prompted considerable community and political debate, which has subsequently highlighted the paucity of authoritative information on the scale and nature of foreign ownership in Australian farmland. Focusing on empirical data from NSW, this article sets out a systematic response to community concerns over changing ownership patterns in Australian farming. First, it contextualises this issue by providing a stocktake of rural land ownership in New South Wales (NSW) over the period 2004–08. This analysis underlines the relatively modest extent to which rural land is owned by corporate entities in NSW. It is concluded that there is considerable diversity in the actors and objectives guiding contemporary investment in rural land, but within this milieu the so-called ‘foreign land grab’ is hardly visible, and a more sophisticated response is required to explain these occurrences. What matters is not the ownership of land per se, but the ways in which landowners utilise their land, and the bridges and connections they have with upstream and downstream participants in agrifood chains, beyond the farm gate
FDI, Foreign Investment, Agriculture, agribusiness, R&D, land ownership, rural, NSW, farm

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