2007 May - Biofuels - Can Agriculture Feed and Fuel the World

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FPJ0402 Article - The Impact of Government Support for Ethanol on the Australian Lot Feeding Industry

Murray, H
Farm Policy Journal, May 2007, Volume 4, Number 2, pp. 41 - 49 (9 pages)

$12.10


 
 




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FPJ0601 Article - Biofuels and Food Security

Raney, T and Croppenstedt, A
Farm Policy Journal, February 2009, Volume 6, Number 1, pp. 17-30 (14 pages)

$12.10


The Implications of Greenhouse Mitigation Policies on the Demand for Agricultural Land

As Australia moves towards the implementation of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, much attention has been directed towards the potential for carbon sink forestry to provide significant amounts of greenhouse gas sequestration, at a relatively modest cost.

While providing immediate sequestration and potential revenue for landholders, there are also some potentially negative aspects of an expansion of carbon sink forestry that require careful consideration.Residents in regions where plantation forestry has already occurred cite adverse socioeconomic impacts arising from large areas of plantations being established on farm land. Concerns have also been expressed about potential negative environmental impacts such as increased bushfire risk, changes to biodiversity, and reductions in water runoff.

Whether or not these impacts might arise in regions where future carbon sink forestry is concentrated will depend very much on the policy framework that is adopted by government to manage this issue.

The research reported here has involved an exploration of these issues, firstly from the perspective of the potential future scale of carbon sink forestry, and then from the perspective of the policy and approvals framework which will determine how carbon sink forestry develops in Australia in the future. It highlights that there is a need for further consideration of this issue and the development of appropriate policy if some of the potential adverse impacts are to be avoided.

The Implications of Greenhouse Mitigation Policies on the Demand for Agricultural Land
  is a compelling review of the existing research and results regarding the possible impacts of carbon sink forestry. The topics covered are:
  • Current scale and rate of land use change
  • Models of potential agricultural land use changes arising from greenhouse mitigation policies
  • Potential impacts of carbon sink plantation developments
  • Carbon sink plantation approval processes
This report constitutes a needed reference for any further research on the topic and outlines the need of consistent policies and approval processes.

Full report
October 2010, pp. 1-116 (116 pages)
Publisher: Australian Farm Institute
Authors: GHD Hassall
ISBN 978-1-921808-04-3 (Web)
ISBN 978-1-921808-03-6 (Print)

$77.00


The Implications of the Australian Government's Carbon Farming Initiative for Beef Producers

The CFI legislation will create a regulated marketplace for farm sequestration and mitigation activities, and farmers who voluntarily participate will earn offset credits which will be able to be sold to businesses that with to use those to reduce their total business emissions, or to claim carbon-neutrality for their products. In many respects, carbon offset production will for some farmers become one extra enterprise option available, bringing with it additional revenue and additional costs, new decisions about how to physically integrate the enterprise into a farm business, and the need for farmers to manage this enterprise in a way that adds to total farm profitability.
The Carbon Farming Initiative (CFI) has been proposed by the Australian Government as a legislated mechanism that will enable farmers to generate revenue from the sale of greenhouse gas sequestration and mitigation activities.

The introduction of a carbon offset market for farms will have significant long-term implications, and will entail both opportunities and risks for farm business managers. The research detailed in this report is an initial attempt to gain some understanding of the issues the farm sector and individual farmers will need to consider as this new farm enterprise emerges.

This report was prepared with funding from Meat & Livestock Australia.

Full report, pp 1-30 (42 pages), April 2011
Australian Farm Institute
Authors: Davison, S, Keogh, M
(Web) ISBN 978-1-921808-09-8
(Print) ISBN 978-1-921808-08-1

$77.00


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